Protecting the Grid/ Synchronicity & the Mind

DATE Monday - January 2, 2017
HOST George Noory
GUESTS William R. Forstchen,  Dr. Kirby Surprise

In the first half, historian, author, and public speakerWilliam Forstchen updated the ongoing campaign to bolster energy and communications infrastructure against EMP attack. An electromagnetic pulse attack, he explained, could occur if a nuclear bomb was detonated about 250 miles above the continental US. The gamma ray burst from the bomb would trigger an electrostatic charge that disables the power grid, and could possibly knock it out for years, unless the system is strengthened. Similarly, an intense solar flare (CME) from the sun could take a heavy toll on the electrical grid, as it did with the Carrington Event of 1859.

 

 

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The Shield Act, which would provide grid protection, passed in the House, but has stalled in the Senate. Forstchen advocated contacting your elected officials saying "I want infrastructure security against EMP and CME, similar to what was stalled twice with the Shield Act." While it would take several years to accomplish, and the cost would be in the billions, it would just be a fraction of our GNP, he noted. Trump understands mega-projects, Forstchen continued, and if the US grid was hardened it would lessen the temptation for a country like North Korea or Iran to attack, if they knew the grid was likely to survive.

 

In the latter half, psychologist Dr. Kirby Surprise discussed the nature of synchronicity, and insights into the brain's processes that reveal hidden abilities. Synchronicity is a term coined by Carl Jung to describe when external events and the internal events of a person's mind seem to coincide with each other. The phenomenon comes about by your own internal state, through what your mind has recently been concerned with, in a kind of mirroring effect that has a neurological basis, he stated. The brain only remembers things that have an emotional charge or valence, so if you are particularly focusing on something, you will tend to notice that subject more in the environment, he pointed out.

 

According to studies, such as JB Rhine's work with dice rolls, it's been shown that humans can influence random events by 3-6%, Dr. Surprise reported. "We are living in a vast network of synchronicities that are created by our own experiences and thoughts...If you realize that how you see the world is based on how you are projecting out into it, and what's being reflected back to you, then you choose the kind of world you live in," he suggested, adding that if you have the chance to change your experience of reality positively by 6%,then this can have a big impact on your life over time.

News segment guest: Mish Shedlock, Steve Kates